Course Descriptions

Course descriptions and instructors are subject to change.

AP/SOSC 1210 9.0 HUMAN RIGHTS IN A SOCIO-LEGAL CONTEXT (General Education Course)

This interdisciplinary course examines Canadian attitudes, institutional practices, and government policies affecting opportunities for full participation in Canadian society for various Canadian minorities, ethnic and religious groups, homosexuals, women, the aged, disabled and poor. Strategies for change are critically analyzed.

Course credit exclusions: None.

This course analyses issues and policies associated with minority status in Canada from an interdisciplinary perspective. Using International Human Rights principles as a framework, the course examines both inferiorized and stigmatized minorities, the forms of prejudice and discrimination responsible for their unequal treatment and disadvantaged life conditions, as well as strategies for change designed to gain recognition for minority rights to dignity, power and equality. Minorities such as women, the aged, aboriginal peoples, racialized minorities, immigrants/refugees, and gays and lesbians will be examined in this context.

This course is structured as a Foundations course with an additional tutorial hour devoted to the development of analytical skills pertinent to the social sciences. It will focus on the critical reading of texts (including relevant documentary films), the development of logical argument, and writing skills.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Two-hour lecture and two-hour tutorial.
Evaluation: In-lecture test, 5%; library research assignment, 15%; essay question test, 20%; essay, 20%; test, 20%; tutorial participation, 20%.
Projected Enrolment: 225
Reserved Spaces: most spaces are reserved for incoming first year students and for some Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC 1350 9.0 GENDER AND THE LAW (General Education Course)

This course examines the relationship between gender inequity and the legal system. The law is analyzed as a form of social control, and this discussion forms the backdrop for exploring a series of current issues that highlight gender inequality. The topics explored include: abortion, reproductive technologies, marriage, divorce, custody, pay equity, equal pay, sexual harassment, rape, pornography, and prostitution.

The course begins with an introduction to the Canadian legal system. The structure of the courts, the role of both common law and statutes, as well as fundamental legal concepts are examined. Throughout the course students are introduced to basic legal research tools such as statutes, regulations, cases and legal literature.

This course is part of the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies Foundations Program. It is intended to assist students in the development of essential university-level skills in reading and writing through the careful analysis of selected scholarly texts in the Social Sciences.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Two-hour lecture and one two-hour tutorial.
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 225
Reserved Spaces: Most spaces are reserved for incoming first year students and for some Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC 1375 3.0 (Fall) INTRODUCTORY SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

This introductory course will provide an overview of several major themes in the field of socio-legal studies, including law and social justice, social science and legal knowledge, law and social change, and law, culture and diversity.

Within these broad themes, substantive topics will differ from year to year in order to reflect both the breadth and diversity of research areas in the field. Students will be introduced to different interdisciplinary approaches to the study of law and society, to basic concepts relating to the functions of law in society, and to different forms of normative order. While this course is required for all students in the Law and Society Program, its overarching objective will be to promote the interdisciplinary study of law in/as culture and will be of interest to a range of undergraduate students, whatever their career plans may be.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Two-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial
Evaluation: t.b.a
Projected Enrolment: 150
Reserved Spaces: Most spaces are reserved for incoming first year students and for Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC 1375 3.0 (Winter) INTRODUCTORY SOCIO-LEGAL STUDIES

This introductory course will provide an overview of several major themes in the field of socio-legal studies, including law and social justice, social science and legal knowledge, law and social change, and law, culture and diversity.

This three credit introductory course will provide an overview of several major themes in the interdisciplinary field of socio-legal studies, including law and social justice, social science and legal knowledge, law and social change, and law, culture and diversity.

Within these broad themes, substantive topics will differ from year to year in order to reflect both the breadth and diversity of research areas in the field. Students will be introduced to different interdisciplinary approaches to the study of law and society, to basic concepts relating to the functions of law in society, and to different forms of normative order. While this course is required for all students in the Law and Society Program, its overarching objective will be to promote the interdisciplinary study of law in/as culture and will be of interest to a range of undergraduate students, whatever their career plans may be.

The specific learning objectives will focus on critical reading and will work toward developing the following skills:

reading for meaning (understanding what you read)
summarizing what you have read
identifying the argument in a reading
evaluating what you have read

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Two-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 150
Reserved Spaces: Most spaces are reserved for incoming first year students and for some Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 LAW & SOCIETY

As of September 2009 Pre/co-requisite: AS/SOSC 1375 3.0

NOTE: As of September 2009, students must achieve a C+ or higher in this required course in order to continue in the Law & Society Program

This is not a pre-law course; it does not lead to law school admission.

Founders of Law & Society have said that "law is too important to leave to lawyers". It is from this point that the course jumps off: together we will examine law using a variety of eclectic and interrelated disciplines including sociology, anthropology, history, political science, criminology philosophy, and psychology. Using these social science disciplines, the interaction between Law & Society will be evaluated. Among the topics to be discussed are aspects of social control, both in legal and non-legal modes, the influence of societal change and social differentiation, the broad functions of law in society and types of legal systems and thought. The course also examines law, policy and values in Canada with emphasis on specific issues that illustrate the interaction between law and social change.

This course examines the interrelationship between law and the social sciences with emphasis on types of legal thought, the function of law in society, legal systems, and a variety of specific issues involving Canadian society and law, such as the legal profession, the criminal process, civil and political rights and family law.

This course is required of all students registered in the Honours Program in Law & Society.

Course Director: Allyson Lunny/t.b.a.
Format: Two one-hour lectures and one-hour tutorial.
Evaluation: First term assignments and exam, 25%; second term assignments and exam, 65%; tutorial participation, 10%, includes both terms.
Projected Enrolment: 325
Reserved Spaces: most spaces are reserved for Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC AP/CRIM 2652 6.0 CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Course Credit Exclusions: AS/SOSC 3381 6.0 (formerly AS/SOSC 3381 6.0) This course is affiliated with the Criminology Program.

This course examines selected practices within the criminal justice system, exploring issues from a combined historical, sociological and legal perspective. Although the focus of the course is the administration of criminal justice in Canada, it also investigates the broader range of crime control practices that exist or have existed across time and place.

Students will be expected to link patterns of criminal justice decision-making to contemporary political debates about law in Canadian society, particularly as these debates affect and are affected by issues of class, race and gender.

The course will explore issues related to discretionary powers and public accountability at different stages of the system. Examples of the topics to be covered include policing (history, discretionary powers, accountability), pre-trial and trial practices (bail, plea-bargaining, legal aid, juries), roles and powers of various legal actors (prosecutors, defence lawyers, lay magistrates, judges), correctional dispositions (probation, prison and community alternatives, parole and mandatory supervision).

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Two-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial.
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 100
Reserved Spaces: Spaces are reserved for Law & Society Students and Criminology Students.

AP/SOSC 3360 6.0 CANADIAN CHARTER OF RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS

Course credit exclusions: AP/POLS 3605 3.0, AP/AK/GL/POLS 3136 3.0 Public Law II

This course examines the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course begins by discussing various theories regarding the legitimacy of judicial review. This approach is carried forward in detailed analyses of sections 1, 2, 7, 15, 25, 33 and 35 of the Constitution Act. These analyses are done through studying decisions of the Supreme Court of Canada and examining them from sociological, political science and other social science perspectives.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Two - hour lecture; One-hour tutorial
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 150
Reserved Spaces: Spaces are reserved for 2nd,3rd, and 4th year Law & Society Students.

AP/SOSC 3361 6.0 DISABILITY AND THE LAW: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON DISABILITY RIGHTS AND LEGISLATION

This course examines disability rights legislation, exploring the trajectory from civil rights to human rights frameworks, and critical perspectives from legal studies, disability studies, and feminist and critical race theory.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 35
Reserved Spaces: Most spaces are reserved for Law & Society Students.

AP/SOSC 3362 6.0 LAW, MEDICINE AND MADNESS

We are a culture fascinated with the concept of "madness." The mad person has been simultaneously represented in popular culture as genius, artistic, comedic and dangerous. There is something profoundly stable about the historical positioning of individuals identified as mentally 'disordered' at the outer boundaries of Canadian social and political life.

This interdisciplinary course traces the conceptual and political history of madness, explores the social meanings of madness and mental illness at key historical moments in Canada, and highlights the interface between the social institutions of law and medicine. The themes of the course aim to contextualize the rise and practices of psychiatric medicine and the psychiatric 'expert' in a political climate preoccupied with concerns about of social decent, qualities of citizenship and National identity. Against this broader context, the course also addresses a number of important ongoing/current issues surrounding mental health/illness, including scientific racism, eugenics, law and public policy, poverty/homelessness, discrimination and human rights, and the mentally disordered offender.

Course Director: Kimberley White
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 35
Reserved Spaces: Spaces are reserved for 3rd and 4th year Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC 3370 6.0 SOCIAL JUSTICE AND LAW

Course credit exclusions: AP/POLS 3250 6.0, AP/HREQ 3450 6.0, GL/SOCI/SOSC 3920 6.0. Prior to 2009 AK/POLS/SOSC 3250 6.0

Issues of social justice have a prominent place in our society. Legal institutions are the most common forum for addressing these controversial issues. Yet, it is not entirely clear that legislation or the courts are always an effective instrument of social policy. When should the law be used to promote the ends of social justice? What are the alternatives?

The course has two principal parts. The first part involves introducing the student to different contemporary theories of social justice. The second involves examining a range of legal and social issues in light of these theories. The general objective is to bridge the gap between the philosophical literature on social justice and the legal and social science literature on questions of social policy.

Course Director: t.b.a
Format: Three-hour seminar.
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 35
Reserved Spaces: Spaces are reserved for 3rd, and 4th year Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC 3375 3.0 (Winter) SOCIO-LEGAL THEORIES

This course offers an overview of the major contemporary theoretical perspectives on law and society. Among the different approaches we consider are those that define law as a source of social and moral regulation, as ideology, and as discourse.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Three-hour seminar.
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: t.b.a.
Reserved Spaces: Spaces are reserved for 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC 3380 6.0 LAW, LABOUR AND THE STATE

Affiliated with the Labour Studies Program.

Please contact the Business & Society Program regarding enrolments 416-736-2100 x77805

Courts have traditionally viewed the relationships between employers and employees in terms of contracts, and have developed a set of doctrines about the rights and obligations of "masters" and "servants" at common law. While legislatures have from time to time passed statutes regulating the employment relationship in various respects, the past half century has seen a dramatic expansion of state activity in this area, and the proliferation of special administrative and quasi-judicial tribunals concerned with one or another aspect of the employment relationship. Since World War II, compulsory collective bargaining has supplanted some important aspects of individual contract making for a substantial proportion of Canadian workers.

Employment is so significant a form of social relations for such a large portion of Canadians that these developments are worth studying in their own right. Beyond that, it is fertile ground for considering a range of questions about the role of the state in modern economic and social life, and about the interrelations of various state agencies and institutions.

The main focus of the course is on contemporary Canada. A principal theme is the extent to which the modern compulsory collective bargaining regime represents a break with the "master and servant" tradition of the common law.

Course Director: Paul Craven
Format: Two-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial.
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 100 spaces.
Reserved Spaces: Some spaces are reserved for 3rd and 4th year Law & Society Majors.

AP/SOSC 3391 6.0 SOCIAL DIVERSITY AND THE LAW

Around the world different peoples have distinct notions of right and wrong. Custom, crime and punishment in one culture may vary greatly from another. These differences are often points of contention, within and between culture groups, and provide exciting material for critical and comparative studies of law and legal systems. This course will examine social diversity and law in North America and around the world. We will focus on a comparative study of the social and cultural processes involved dispute management, social justice, social control and social deviance.

Through this comparative study we will learn about themes, theories and methods central to the study of law in the social sciences. We will consider the complex processes through which laws shape social life and how social life shapes the creation, transformation and elimination of laws. We will explore how people invoke law and their daily struggles to resist gender, racial, ethnic, religious, and class based domination.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Three-hour seminar.
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 35
Reserved Spaces: Spaces are reserved for 3rd and 4th year Law & Society Students.

AP/SOSC 3392 6.0 INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES IN LAW & SOCIETY: ETHNOGRAPHIES OF RIGHTS

This course examines the contribution of legal anthropology to the study of contemporary socio-legal issues, in general, and human rights struggles, in particular. Historically, anthropologists were reluctant to delve into international human rights law given their perception that human rights could not transcend moral diversity. While some anthropologists maintain this point of view, it is generally acknowledged that such an argument is premised on a static conception of culture. Once one sees culture as dynamic and productive as well as interpenetrated with other systems of meaning, then cultural relativism in human right loses some of its weight.

This course examines these questions through theoretical writings on human rights and anthropology as well as ethnographies of human rights struggles. Legal anthropologists increasingly are turning their skills to the study of human rights at the local and international levels.

Course Director: David Szablowski
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrollment: 35
Reserved Spaces: Most spaces are reserved for Law & Society Students.

AP/SOSC 3992 6.0 POPULAR TRIALS

Course credit exclusions: AS/SOSC 3990B 6.0

This course focuses on popular trials or judicial proceedings that engage the interest of a general audience usually sustained by some form of mass communication. Such trials-whether or not they result in establishing new legal norms-are public events that can serve as cultural reference points for beliefs that unite or divide the community.

The first part of the course introduces the conceptual tools and theoretical orientations that will later be applied for specific popular trials. We will draw upon works in cultural studies and interpretive sociology to look at trials as social enactments that make use of ritual and dramaturgy to achieve the effects. Popular trials will also be approached from the vantage point of communication studies and critical semiotics to show how these events filter experience and how they generate representations of social reality that in turn become the focus of intense public debate and discussion.

Each of the specific trials that we consider will be looked at in historical context and in relation to the legal culture of the period. Second, we will look at the meanings that contemporaries assigned to the trials and, where applicable, the meaning that these events have been given by later generations. Third, we will analyze each trial in terms of its social representation, its use of ritual and dramaturgy, its narratives, and its competing discourses. Finally, we will search for features that invite comparisons with other trials.

Course Director: Richard Weisman
Format: Two-hour lecture and one-hour tutorial.
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrollment: 150
Reserved Spaces: Spaces are reserved for 2nd, 3rd, and 4th year Law & Society Honours Majors.

AS/SOSC 3363 3.0 (FALL) RESEARCH STRATEGIES IN LAW & SOCIETY

(Formerly 3990C 3.0)

Course credit exclusions: AP/SOSC 3993 3.0 AND AP/SOSC 3990C 3.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-04)

This is a course in critical social science methodology, designed to improve students' abilities to read and evaluate socio-legal research. The major research methods will be studied in the course using exemplary texts and hands on assignments. Among the methods considered and compared are: quasi-experiments, surveys, ethnography, historical method, case studies, text analysis, and action research.

The course is not primarily about how to conduct a research project, although the skills developed in the course are essential for socio-legal researchers as well as for those who rely on social science knowledge in support of public policy and social action. Rather, the emphasis is on acquiring the ability to understand and evaluate research findings and reports. This ability is essential in any career or undertaking that relies on empirical evidence and analysis.

This course is mounted by the Law & Society Program in the Division of Social Science. Spaces are reserved for majors in the Law & Society Program.

Course Director: Maura Matesic
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: tba.
Projected Enrolment: 35
Reserved Spaces: Spaces are reserved for 3rd and 4th year Law & Society students.

AP/SOSC 3364 3.0 (WINTER) DESIGNING RESEARCH IN LAW & SOCIETY

(Formerly 3990C 3.0)

Course Credit exclusions: AP/SOSC 3993 3.0

This is a course in critical social science methodology, designed to improve students' abilities to read and evaluate social research. The major research methods will be studied in the course using exemplary texts and hands on assignments. This course examines the contribution of legal anthropology to the study of contemporary socio-legal issues, in general, and human rights struggles, in particular. Historically, anthropologists were reluctant to delve into international human rights law given their perception that human rights could not transcend moral diversity.

While some anthropologists maintain this point of view, it is generally acknowledged that such an argument is premised on a static conception of culture. Once one sees culture as dynamic and productive as well as interpenetrated with other systems of meaning, then cultural relativism in human rights loses some of its weight.

This course examines these questions through theoretical writings on international human rights and anthropology as well as ethnographies of human rights struggles. Legal anthropologists increasingly are turning their skills to the study of human rights at the local and international levels.

Among the methods considered and compared are: quasi-experiments, surveys, ethnography, historical method, case studies, text analysis, and action research. The course is not primarily about how to conduct a research project, although the skills developed in the course are essential for researchers as well as for those who rely on social science knowledge in support of public policy and social action. Rather, the emphasis is on acquiring the ability to understand and evaluate research findings and reports. This ability is essential in any career or undertaking that relies on empirical evidence and analysis as the basis for rational decisions.

This course is jointly mounted by the Labour Studies, Law & Society, and Health and Society Programs in the Division of Social Science. A number of places are reserved for majors in these Programs.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: tba.
Projected Enrolment: Section A: 35 Section M: 35 and Section: N
Reserved Spaces: Some spaces are reserved for Labour Studies, Health and Society and Law & Society Students.

AP/SOSC 4350 6.0 Special Topics in LASO

AP/SOSC 2005 6.0A - Religion, Governance and Law
Course Director: Amelie Barras
Term: FW
Time: M 11:30-2:30
Room: 012 ACE

These courses are designed to integrate the Honours Program in Law & Society at the upper level. The focus of each section will reflect the particular interests of individual course directors. Details about each section will be available on the Law & Society website in August, 2006.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

AP/SOSC 2005 6.0B - Law, Youth and Sexual Citizenship
Course Director:
 Emily Lockhart
Term: FW
Time: R 8:30-11:30
Room: 214 BC

This course will explore the concept of sexual citizenship in the context of youth. It will introduce students to the ways in which sexual politics and legal discourse construct and discipline the boundaries of inclusion and exclusion for young sexual subjects. Students will learn that young people’s contingent relationship to sexual citizenship makes it all the more important to focus on their own understandings of laws relating to their sexual practices. In addition to critical sexuality studies, the course draws on childhood studies in order to address the link between childhood, sexuality, and citizenship. During the first semester students will engage with theories and concepts pertaining to sexual and intimate citizenship, the social construction of childhood and adolescence, the regulation of youth sexuality, and age of consent/age of protection laws. The second semester will focus more narrowly on digital sexual citizenship by introducing students to the legal, political, and educational responses to expressions of youth sexuality in a digital age as well as how these issues are represented in the media and popular culture. We will critically examine the gendered, heteronormative, racialized, and classed nature of these responses. Considering the social location of youth and the ways in which their lives are often shaped by digital culture, this course combines theories of legal consciousness with ideas of sexual citizenship to understand how youth are engaging with legal and extra legal responses, public dialogues, and debates about sexual violence, technology, cyberbullying, sexting, and the non-consensual sharing of intimate images. Students will have the opportunity to learn about and critically analyze recent cases in Canada and the United States.

AP/SOSC 4351 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND LAW

This course looks at the role of law in the lives of Indigenous people in Canada from at least three intersecting perspectives. One focus of the course examines the way in which Indigenous people view law and order maintenance both historically and in a contemporary sense. Another focus looks at the way in which law has been used by the state to take away the rights of Indigenous people. The third lens is one that sees the how these two perspectives try to work themselves out today. To what extent can the Canadian state recognize the need for self-determination for Indigenous people within a constitutional framework that has only recently recognized rights of Indigenous people? How can the parties negotiate these relationships? What is the role of the courts in these cases? Comparisons will be made with the situations of Indigenous people in other countries such as the United States and Australia.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: t.b.a.
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Format: Three-hour seminar
Projected Enrollment: 25

AP/SOSC 4352 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF CRIMINAL LAW

This course is designed to equip students with the conceptual and methodological tools necessary to read and interpret legal discourse not just as a set of technical rules but as a language that has social, political, and moral dimensions. Cases drawn from Canadian criminal law (but also American and British law) are used to illustrate tensions between doctrine and policy as well as to make explicit what is at stake in judicial interpretations for differently positioned social groups based on gender, class, ethnicity, and culture.

The course also looks more closely at how legal discourse itself acknowledges a social dimension in criminal acts by looking at the defenses of duress, compulsion, and necessity as well as recent amendments to the criminal code affecting the sentencing of aboriginal offenders

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrollment: 25

AP/SOSC 4353 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: NARRATIVES OF LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY

This interdisciplinary course uses the complimentary tools of narrative studies and textual analysis to examine the relationship between art, science and law in cultural representations of legal responsibility. We begin with reflections on the performative nature of law as both art and science as a way of contextualizing popular theories about the (ir)responsible legal subject.

We then turn to focus more sharply on themes such as order/disorder, madness, authority/resistance, danger and disease as they are (re)produced at various cultural sites. For example, we might look at how narratives of dangerousness can be traced through legal defences to criminal responsibility (defences such as intoxication, provocation, self-defence and mental disorder), as well as through the production of crime films and pulp fiction.

We might also consider the form and function of narratives of order/disorder and authority/resistance in the production of graffiti art as well as in anti-graffiti legislation. In each area of study we will be concerned with the effects of narrative and the cultural meaning of particular representations of responsibility. Throughout the year we will draw inspiration from a range of materials including legal doctrine, case law, archival documents, media, film, fiction and resistance writing, visual arts and scholarly literature. The expectation is that students will work toward producing an original piece of interdisciplinary socio-Iegal research.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: Kimberley White
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrollment: 25

AP/SOSC 4354 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: PARADOXES OF RIGHTS

Selected themes revolve around issues of human rights and social change. Specifically, we examine how rights discourse is employed by and applied to various communities in society as part of socio-political struggles. The course is organized into four modules. The first five weeks of the course is a (re)introduction to social theories of legal rights. The next section of the seminar examines particular issues at the national level and explores the utility and complexity of human rights claims in those debates. The third portion of the course takes up these concerns at the international level. The final module will include student presentations of their research papers as well as selected readings on social change.

The participants in this seminar will have an opportunity to critically reflect on the themes of identity politics, cultural autonomy and equality while also exploring concrete issues in law to which these larger themes apply. There will also be a volunteer placement with a human rights organization.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: Annie Bunting
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a.
Projected Enrolment: 25

AP/SOSC 4355 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: GENDER, SEX AND THE SUPREME COURT

In this seminar course, selected themes revolve around issues of human rights, social change and gender equity. Specifically, we examine how rights discourse is employed by and applied to various issues such as equality and diversity in society as part of socio-political struggles.

The first section of the seminar is a (re)introduction to social theories of legal rights with a focus on gender, race, class and ability. Using this theoretical base the next section examines how particular issues such as obscenity/pornography, reproductive rights, and sexual orientation are treated in Supreme Court cases. Students will be called upon to do short weekly presentations of readings and of their final research papers.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: Patricia McDermott
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: Case assignment 30%
Major Research Paper Proposal 10%
Major Research Paper 40%
Attendance, Participation and Presentations 20%
Projected Enrolment: 25

AP/SOSC 4356 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: GLOBALIZATION, LAW AND DEMOCRACY

This course aims to assist students to understand the effects that globalization is having on law, legal authority, and democratic governance. The course focuses on the influence of globalization on state regulation and on the international system. It is also intended to provide an overview of contemporary efforts at transnational law-making in a number of different arenas. Together, these components are intended to demonstrate how globalization presents actors, whether public or private, with a mixture of new opportunities and constraints with regard to legal ordering.

Analysis and class discussion will return to the issue of the implications that these various developments have for democratic theory and practice. Students will be asked to reflect upon the meaning of democratic governance in a world in which globalization and interdependence are deepening.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: David Szablowski
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a
Projected Enrolment: 25

AP/SOSC 4357 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: EXPLORATIONS IN SOCIOLEGAL HISTORY

This course engages students in the historical study of a topic in law and society through background reading, discussion, and exercises with historical documents. Students then propose, research, write and present research papers using archival and other primary sources. The first term introduces students to the practice of sociolegal history through directed reading in exemplary works and discussions of historical method and sociolegal. Students identify topics of interest and prepare annotated bibliographies. Workshops with archivists and hands-on exercises in seminar focus on the uses and abuses of primary materials.

In the second term each student completes a research paper and presents progress reports for discussion in seminar. Each student maintains a research diary to be reviewed with the course director at least twice during the term. The course concludes with a student symposium in which completed papers are presented and discussed.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: Paul Craven
Format: Two-hour seminar/workshop; individual tutorials (tba); symposium.
Evaluation: Brief review essay (5%); annotated bibliography (10%); workshop assignments (10%); research proposal (10%); research diary (10%); research paper (30%); seminar/tutorial participation (20%); symposium (5%).
Projected enrolment: 25

AP/SOSC 4358 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: LAW AND SEXUALITY

This course is designed to integrate the Honours Program in Law and Society at the upper level. Specifically, this seminar examines the ambiguous and shifting role law plays with respect to sexuality. What is of interest to this course are those sites where legal issues, specifically harm, consent, and human rights, butt up against philosophical and social issues, namely, personal liberty, desire, moral panic, and "othering."

Topic areas include obscenity, risk of harm, age of consent, sexually transmitted disease, asylum-seeking, & reproductive rights and technologies. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, that is to say, we will draw on and across a variety of disciplines in order to pose questions about the place of law on the bodies and in the expression and the practices of sexual subjects.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: Allyson Lunny
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a
Projected Enrolment: 25

AP/SOSC 4359 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: LAW & GOVERNANCE

This course is designed to integrate the Honours Program in Law & Society at the upper level. The focus of each section will reflect the particular interests of individual course directors.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: David Szablowski
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a
Projected Enrolment: 25

AP/SOSC 4360 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: LEGAL CONSCIOUSNESS AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Does law matter? Do court decisions make a difference? Does legal change lead to social change? This course explores these questions through a consideration of the literatures on social movements, legal consciousness, and litigation, mainly in Canada and the U.S.

The course will consider how social movements have used courts to achieve their goals and the effects of these efforts for legal consciousness and policy change. Case studies may include the women's movement, the environmental movement, indigenous peoples' movements, the civil rights movement and religious movements, among others. Students may pursue their own interests through the completion of a research paper.

As of September 2009, Students must complete AP/SOSC 2350 6.0 Law and Society, with a minimum grade of C+, prior to enrolling in any of the Law & Society Honours Seminars. All spaces are reserved for 4th Year Law & Society Majors, who have completed the equivalent of 84 credits by the end of the F/W academic year in April. No exceptions!

Course Director: Miriam Smith
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a
Projected Enrolment: 25

AP/SOSC 4361 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: LAW, CULTURE AND REPRESENTATION

This course is designed to integrate the Honours Program in Law & Society at the upper level. The focus of each section will reflect the particular interests of individual course directors.

Course Director: t.b.a.
Format: Three-hour seminar
Evaluation: t.b.a
Projected Enrolment: 25

AP/SOSC 4362 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: LAW AND POLITICS

AP/SOSC 4363 6.0 HONOURS SEMINAR: LAW, CITIZENSHIP AND MIGRATION

AP/SOSC 4370 6.0 STATE OF THE ART IN LAW & SOCIETY